a jar lined with a nut milk bag

When raw milk turns sour it separated into whey, semi-translusent yellowish liquid, and milk solids. It’s practically impossible to find raw milk today so we use plain yogurt.

Milk contains two main types of protein: whey and casein. Casein is very hard for us to digest and is a common cause of dairy allergy or sensitivity. When you make liquid whey you end up with mostly whey protein because most casein stays with milk solids.

Health benefits of whey

  • Whey made from yogurt or cultured milk is full of Lactobacilli, bacteria that can improve our gut health.
  • Whey protein is an excellent source of protein and helps maintain youthful muscle mass and body weight.
  • It’s highest in branch-chain amino acids that help repair muscles and build muscle mass if taken after exercise.
  • It’s also high in cysteine, the amino acid needed for detoxification as well as formation of glutathione – the most powerful antioxidant in our body.
  • Whey has been found to reduce blood sugar and insulin levels in both healthy people and Type 2 diabetics.

How to Use Whey

Whey has a lightly sour and salty taste. You can take it as “medicine” by spoon but there are better ways to consume it.

  • If you don’t have dairy sensitivity you can try whey as a starter for many ferments.
  • It can be added to smoothies and soups.
  • As a replacement of water in baking.

To make whey I highly recommend using organic plain whole milk yogurt that contains live cultures. I use Seven Stars Farm Original Plain yogurt made right on the farm in Pennsylvania. It’s the best yogurt that I’m could find.

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Whey

Ingredients:

1-2 lb high quality whole plain yogurt with live cultures

Directions:

  1. Line a 1-2 quart glass jar with a nut milk bag, cheesecloth folded several times or a piece of clean dishtowel. Make sure to leave space (a couple of inches) underneath the fabric where the whey will be collecting. Secure the fabric with a rubber band or a string.
  2. Carefully pour the yogurt into the nut bag or fabric and let it drip into the jar.
  3. The liquid that collects at the bottom is whey. Make sure the whey and the yogurt don’t touch.
  4. After a couple of hours you will have a more solid yogurt on the top that will resemble Greek yogurt, and the liquid whey separated at the bottom .
  5. If you have a lot of milk solids floating on the top of the whey, you might want to strain it through a more dense piece of fabric to filter them out.
  6. Transfer the whey into a glass jar with a lid. You can use it right away or cover and store in the fridge for 4-6 months. Use your nose to check the quality of the whey before each use. Fresh whey should have a very slight sour smell to it.